We just announced our prelims for 2010 the other day.

Over the past 12 months (to 30 April 2010), Imagination Technologies increased group revenue with 26%, with royalty revenue up a whopping 75% and licensing of new technologies keeps on trucking, despite the very cautious economic landscape we carefully navigate.

Here at Imagination Technologies we are of course very proud of such a brilliant result, and we have worked hard for it.

But what does that actually mean for our 3rd party developers?

Chips with our technology embedded increased 47% to 126 million units shipped. That is spread across more than 180 different products in mobile, 15 TV models, 90 netbooks/tablets etc.

In short: PowerVR has long been the de facto standard for graphics acceleration on embedded devices, and the number of products with PowerVR technology keeps on climbing rapidly – as does the areas of use. You might have learned about the PowerVR graphics architecture for the first waves of smart phones with graphics hardware acceleration, such as the Sony Ericsson M600i or Nokia N93, or maybe even back in the SEGA Dreamcast days, but that knowledge is quickly becoming very valuable in new and different product categories such as personal media players, navigation devices, digital TVs or set-top boxes, tablets, MIDs and notebooks and many, many more.

If you have just joined us recently, now is a good time to familiarise yourself with developing for PowerVR technologies. It is only going to get bigger from here on…

About the author: David Harold

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David Harold is senior director for marketing communications at Imagination Technologies. David worked for several advertising and PR agencies promoting everything from fashion to valves before specialising in technology. David joined Imagination in 1998 and has been with the company though its rebranding from VideoLogic, its entry into the console and mobile markets, the launch of the Pure brand, and the launches of key products including Pure’s Evoke, Bug and Sensia, Caustic’s R2500 and R2100 ray tracing boards and Imagination’s Ensigma, Meta, PowerVR and Flow IPs.

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