Tag: Google


Imagination designed its PowerVR Tile-Based Deferred Rendering (TBDR) graphics architecture more than 20 years ago with a focus on efficiency across performance, power consumption and system level integration. This approach has equally been applied to our integration of compute functionality in our GPU architecture; PowerVR Rogue is the most recent version of our GPU architecture and it fully supports mobile

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Over the past few months, we’ve seen a new wave of announcements related to Internet of Things (IoT) and other ultra-portable devices integrating Imagination IP. One of the biggest buzz words right now is wearable devices; there were several wearable concepts introduced at CES 2014, covering any and every use case, from augmented and virtual reality or entertainment to fitness,

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This week marks a very important announcement for Chromium, the open source counterpart to Google’s Chrome web browser. Starting with Chrome 31, Google has enabled the Portable Native Client (PNaCl, pronounced ‘pinnacle’) by default. This provides developers a way to bring native performance to HTML5 applications while still keeping applications portable AND secure. PNaCl allows HTML5 applications to unleash the

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Compute APIs are a new evolution in the mobile and embedded market space, and are subject to quite a range of different conceptual approaches compared to the evolution of 3D graphics API. The mobile-optimised OpenGL ES API for 3D graphics evolved from a market-tested and well-proven OpenGL API for desktop PCs; this allowed a rapid API evolution with fairly little

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At the recent 2013 International CES, Broadcom and Samsung announced the world’s first Android 4.0 set top box with Google Mobile Services (GMS). This first-of-its-kind device is based on—you guessed it, MIPS! While dozens of Android set-top boxes already exist in the market, Samsung’s SMT-E5015 Smart TV box is the first to pass the stringent Android compatibility and GMS test

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Imagination Technologies is working with our partner and licensee Microchip Technology, a leading microcontroller company, to further promote the use of the MIPS® architecture to universities in Russia and Ukraine. Microchip’s PIC32 microcontroller uses the MIPS32® M4K™ core, and development boards based on the PIC32 are ideal vehicles through which students can learn about microcontroller-based system design as well as

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When Google launched Android, it had a very apparent goal of portability. Starting with the underlying Linux kernel, all layers of Android are designed and implemented to be portable. Android runs on all three major processor architectures – MIPS, Intel and ARM. It also supports a variety of memory configurations, flash storage and graphics processors. When it comes to applications,

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