Tag: SoC


According to the latest data published by the World Health Organization (WHO), there were 1.25 million road traffic deaths globally in 2013. More than 36,000 people have lost their life in the United States due to car accidents; the numbers paint an even more unfortunate picture for China and India: both countries have registered more than 200,000 road traffic-related deaths.

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If you look at the semiconductor landscape today, the number of companies that have the ability to design advanced SoCs is shrinking rapidly. Industry consolidation/verticalization and rising manufacturing costs are creating an environment where true differentiation is difficult to achieve using generic solutions. In addition, integrating high performance CPUs, GPUs, coherent fabrics and other hardware blocks requires deep expertise, increasing

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A few weeks ago I was working on this blog article, trying to figure out how to best represent our products visually. After I completed the work and was on my lunch break, a question came to mind: if I were building my own mobile application processor, what it would look like? The answer lies in the diagram below; please

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If you think of smartphones and tablets as the go-to devices for personal computing, you’ve probably wondered quite a few times how technology has evolved to the point where consumers can now run demanding applications that bring unique, feature-rich user experiences yet rely on mobile chipsets requiring a few watts of power. The answer lies in efficient processing. All our

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I’ve recently returned from the Linley Tech Mobile Conference, an exciting event held yearly in Silicon Valley that features a two day, single track marathon of technical presentations related to mobile processing from a range of companies such as Synopsys, Intel, GLOBALFOUNDRIES, Qualcomm (all part of Imagination’s growing ecosystem, might I add) and many others. This year we were greeted

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Imagination has a number of close links with universities supporting both research and teaching programmes.  One example of this is the Group Design Project which is done as part of the University of Southampton Electronic and Computer Science undergraduate Master of Electronic Engineering (MEng) courses.  The project lasts for 10 weeks, and the students work in groups of five. External

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